In a time where people are becoming savvier, what may have worked 2 years ago, isn’t always effective today.   For example, in the “good old days” (about 18-24 months ago,) when it came to search, most people relied on Google.  If someone was searching for your product or service, they would go to Google, type in what they were looking for, and either find your product or service—or not.   rubik cubeBut now, the market has shifted. Google isn’t the only thing people use anymore.   In fact, Stathunter just revealed that for the first time Google dropped below the 75 percent mark for search marketshare. And now that Yahoo is the default search engine for Firefox, they are gaining even more marketshare, growing three times in the past three months. So while Google is still King, Bing and Yahoo now make up just over 26 percent of the search market.   This does not even factor in things such as social media marketing which has become a hot trend to add to the mix, especially Facebook marketing.   So the truth of the matter is that the search marketing environment has evolved and converged. The relationship between marketers and consumers has become more complex.   I will say that one place Google still reigns supreme is when it comes to emergencies and impulse buys. For instance, when your kitchen sink is backed up and you need to find a plumber, Google is people’s #1 go-to source.   Google paid search can also increase impulse buys. For instance, including reminders of specific holidays such as Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day or showcasing deals relating to your consumers’ search results can trigger fast purchases.   However, in the current market, most businesses can’t rely on emergencies and impulse buying purchases alone.   So if your business typically experiences a longer buying cycle or your customers typically do more research, then to get the sale, you need more than just Google search. You need additional communication touch points across multiple channels that can be seen on multiple devices.   In fact, according to Google’s ZMOT, “the average consumer engages with 18.2 pieces of online content before making a final purchasing decision.” And Marin Software predicts that 50% of Google searches will be done on mobile devices by December of this year.   I’m witnessing this happen with my clients too. For example, one of my clients used to kill it with PPC on Google only.  When his results started to decline using methods that had always pulled well, we began testing some new marketing for him.  

Your New Winning Strategy

What I found was that using a combination of strategies that included PPC, remarketing, display ads, Facebook ads, Youtbe ads and Bing ads did the trick. We also made sure that his ads could be viewed on mobile devices, desktop computers, and tablets. This new combination out pulled his former model.   For your business, it might be that you need PPC, remarketing, direct mail, Youtube and Facebook.  I can’t say for sure within the space of this article as it depends on your target market, the length of a typical sales cycle, and a number of other factors. But what I can say for sure is that the market has changed and it requires a more sophisticated marketing strategy if you want to cut through the noise and get the best return.  

Three Key Takeaways You Can Use In Your Business Right Now:

  1. It is no longer enough to rely on a single channel for all your marketing. You must diversify and combine multiple marketing channels if you want to stay on top.
  2. Examining your target audience, their behavior patterns and preferred marketing channels, will help determine which marketing channels you should test first.
  3. Your ads and content must be mobile, tablet, AND desktop friendly as consumers are doing research and making buying decisions across multiple devices.
Standing still and continuing to market in the same way you have been is dangerous. Keep up with what is working and what isn’t. Test new strategies. And keep your marketing a moving target so you’ll never be left behind.   If your marketing isn’t pulling what it used to or if you want to avoid a decline, contact me for a free consultation. I can help you determine what is working for your particular product or service and target market and help you decide what to test first.   Here’s to your online success!   Yours Truly,   Eric
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 | Posted by | Categories: Facebook, local marketing, Other - Advertising & Marketing, Search Engine Optimization, Small Business, Social media |
Here I`ll discuss what a unique selling proposition (USP) is and why it’s so valuable. You`ll find a step-by-step process for creating a USP that will help you make the most of your marketing and business planning activities. What is a USP? A USP is one of the fundamental pieces of any solid marketing campaign. Simply stated, it’s a summary of what makes your business unique and valuable to your target market. It answers the question: How do your business services benefit your clients better than anyone else can? In my previous post, I suggested replacing your traditional business plan with three key pieces, one of which is your USP. This is because a USP can give a great deal of clarity to your business model, what your company does and why you do it. It can define your business and most important business goals in just a sentence. Successful USPs can be used as a company slogan and should be incorporated into all of your marketing activities. OK, now that we’re clear on what a USP is and why it’s so valuable, let’s start creating one. Step 1: Describe Your Target Audience Before you can even start marketing your services, you need to know who you are targeting. In this step, you want to be as specific as possible. For example, if you are a Web developer with a CMS expertise, instead of targeting anyone who needs helping building or modifying a CMS, you may identify your target client as a small business owner who is looking for a developer well-versed in MODx to customize his/her site. Step 2: Explain the Problem You Solve From your prospective clients’ perspective, what is the individual need or challenge they face that your business can solve for them? Step 3: List the Biggest Distinctive Benefits In this step, list 3-5 of the biggest benefits a client gets from choosing to work with you that they could not get from someone else (i.e., what sets you apart from your competition). Again, thinking from the clients’ perspective, these benefits should explain why your services are important to them and why they would choose you over another provider. Step 4: Define Your Promise A big part of a successful USP is making a pledge to your clients. While this can be implied instead of spelled out in your USP, write down this promise you make to your clients in this step. Step 5: Combine and Rework Once you’ve completed steps 1-4, take all of the information you listed and combine it into one paragraph. There should be some recurring ideas and thoughts, so you’ll want to start merging statements and rewriting in a way that flows and makes sense. Step 6: Cut it Down In this step, take your paragraph from step 5 and condense it even more into just a sentence. You want your final USP to be as specific and simple as possible. Take your time while doing this exercise and do several drafts over the course of a week until you arrive at your final USP. A fresh mind and perspective is essential, so I would recommend doing this at the beginning of your day versus at the end when you are tired. You also may want to come back and do this exercise again, once you try out your USP for a while, or if anything changes with your business. To see what the final result should look like, Wikipedia has some good examples of successful USPs. Do you have a USP? If not, do you think you’ll take time to create one?  
Conner asked:


I’ve looked at IBP and Web CEO and want something with more features. Thanks!

Chris Johnson
Welcome to my new blog and Twitter account specifically designed to help online entrepreneurs. Look out for great question and answer sessions Looking forward to serving you Cheers Eric$
nuMantis Inc asked:


I am owner of a technology company, we are still really new and we are finding that our local area are uneducated in what SEO is or what the web can do for them, I am wondering if anyone knows of any places to get quality leads for this genre of service and if there are any “tricks” to gaining attention to the services we offer. We are looking for low cost/free ways to do this.

Michael Smith
Matty B asked:


Does anyone have any facts or guidance on the SEO impact of using interstitial ads? They appear on a number of “big budget” sites like top-tier newspapers, magazines and video sites yet my guess is that Google and others would take a less favorable view of small sites using these ads. They are quite admittedly annoying, but can be profitable and beneficial in some situations. Does anyone have any first-hand experience working with these ads and the results (good, bad or non-existent) from the various search engines?

Mike Smith